Flora fauna

Plants/flora

The indigenous (or natural, native) flora of the site can be broadly divided into two categories.

A. Disturbed indigenous plant communities – “Modified Bushland”.

Some of the indigenous plant communities along the upper reaches of Lawson Creek have been disrupted by weeds (scroll down for weed list) or infrastructure development such as pipe and power line construction. In these communities invasive exotic flora species, weeds, such as Privet, Blackberry and Japanese Honeysuckle dominate or intermingle with individual and small stands of mixed native species.

Modified bushland: indigenous flora and weeds in foreground Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill
Modified bushland: indigenous flora, with foreground weeds being treated Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill

B. Intact indigenous plant communities.

There are four types of indigenous vegetation communities present at the South Lawson Park bushcare site: Open-forest, consisting of various dominant tree species, densely vegetated stream (riparian) strips, swamps and small patches of rainforest. Here they are.

  • Eucalyptus sieberi woodland South Lawson Park Dec 2018 Photo: P Ardill
  • Upper Lawson Creek December 2017 Photo: P Ardill
  • Healthy swamp, Waratah Street regeneration area Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill
  • Rainforest glade South Lawson Park Photo: V Hong 2017

To view the locations of each of these plant communities, visit the Blue Mountains City Council website at https://www.bmcc.nsw.gov.au/development/developing-land/property-search and click on View Interactive Maps. Search South Lawson Park and access Menu/Vegetation community.

1. Open-forest.

These forests form a canopy that allows penetration of sunlight, and consist of a variety of medium height to tall tree species, and associated shrubs, grasses and herbs. At South Lawson Park this forest vegetation community is comprised of two tree groupings.

A. Eucalyptus piperita (Sydney Peppermint) – Angophora costata (Smooth-barked Apple)

B. Corymba gummifera (Red Bloodwood) – Eucalyptus sieberi (Black or Silvertop Ash).

These forests and their trees are the most extensive form of vegetation present on the site. The trees and other plants of these two communities have evolved to grow on sandstone based soils that are of average to low fertility and very well drained.

Woodland (Eucalyptus and Angophora species) bordering denser riparian vegetation in background, Lawson Creek, December 2017 Photo: P Ardill
Forest (Eucalyptus and Angophora species) in foreground bordering denser riparian vegetation in background, Lawson Creek, December 2017 Photo: P Ardill

Here is a list of the major Open-forest tree, shrub and ground-layer species located on and near the bushcare site.

Acacia terminalis Sunshine Wattle

Angophora costata Smooth-barked Apple, tree

Angophora costata Lawson Creek Photo: V Hong 2017
Angophora costata Lawson Creek 2017 Image: V Hong
Angophora costata x 2, Cataract Creek, 2020 Photo: E Carmichael
Angophora costata x 2, Cataract Creek, 2020 Photo: E Carmichael

Banksia spinulosa Hairpin Banksia

Banksia serrata Old Man Banksia

Billardiera scandens Apple Berry, climber

Cassytha pubescens Devil’s Twine, climber

Caustis flexuosa Old Man’s Beard

Corymba gummifera Red Bloodwood, tree

Dampiera stricta, small shrub

Daviesia corymbosa Narrow Leaf Bitter Pea, shrub

Dianella caerulea, Blue Flax Lily

Dianella: V Hong
Dianella sp. Lawson 2017 Image: V Hong

Dillwynia retorta, shrub

Entolasia sp. Right-angled grass

Entolasia sp. grass Lawson Photo: V Hong
Entolasia sp. grass Lawson 2017 Image: V Hong

Eucalyptus piperita Sydney Peppermint, tree

Eucalyptus sp. likely sclerophylla Scribbly Gum, tree

Eucalyptus sieberi Black or Silvertop Ash, tree

Eucalyptus sieberi forest Lawson Creek Dec 2018 Photo: P Ardill
Grove of Eucalyptus sieberi Lawson Creek Dec 2018 Photo: P Ardill

Gompholobium sp., shrub

Goodenia bellidifolia, 

Grevillea sp., shrub

Grevillea sp. Photo: V Hong
Grevillea sp. Lawson 2017 Image: V Hong

Hakea dactyloides, shrub/small tree

Hakea salicifolia, shrub/small tree

Hakea sericea Needlebush, tall shrub

Hermarthria uncinata Matgrass (in disturbed regeneration area), grass

Isopogon anemonifolius Drumsticks, shrub

Kunzea ambigua Tick Bush, tall shrub, small tree

Lambertia formosa Mountain Devil, shrub

Mountain Devil flower, Cascade Creek, Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill
Mountain Devil, Cataract Creek, 2020 Photo: P Ardill

Leptospermum polygalifolium Tea-tree, small tree

Leptospermum trinervium Flaky-bark Tea-tree, small tree

Flaky-bark Tea-tree forest, Lawson Creek riparian zone Feb 2019 Photo: P Ardill
Flaky-bark Tea-tree grove, Lawson Creek Feb 2019 Photo: P Ardill

Leucopogon lanceolatus, shrub

Lomandra longifolia

Lomandra obliqua

Lomatia silaifolia

Lycopodium deuterodensum Club moss

Microlaena stipoides Weeping Meadow grass

Patersonia sericeaNative Iris

Persoonia levis Broad-leaved Geebung, shrub

Persoonia mollis, shrub

Petrophile pulchella, shrub

Petrophile sp. Photo: V Hong 2017
Petrophile sp. Lawson 2017 Image: V Hong 2017

Platysace linearifolia, small shrub

Polyscias sambucifolia Elderberry Panax, shrub

Polyscias sambucifolia, regeneration area Feb 2019 Photo: P Ardill
Polyscias sambucifolia, regeneration area Feb 2019 Photo: P Ardill

Pteridium esculentum Bracken Fern

Bracken fern Photo: V Hong 2017
Bracken fern 2017 Image: V Hong

2. Blue Mountains Riparian Complex.

Sections of the Lawson Creek bank have richer than average soils due to a high content of deposited alluviums. They support moisture loving plants such as ferns, gahnias and the small tree species Black Wattle, as well as eucalypyts, banksias, hakeas, acacias and tea-trees, sometimes in dense groves.

Riparian vegetation Lawson Creek December 2017 Photo: P Ardill
Riparian vegetation Lawson Creek December 2017 Photo: P Ardill

Acacia elata Cedar Wattle, tree

Acacia elata Cedar Wattle Photo: P Ardill
Acacia elata Cedar Wattle Waratah St 2020 Photo: P Ardill

Blechnum nudum Fishbone Fern

Blechnum nudum fern Lawson Creek Photo: V Hong 2017
Blechnum nudum fern Lawson Creek 2017 Image: V Hong

Callicoma serratifolia Black Wattle, small tree

Cyathea australis Rough Tree Fern

Lush riparian vegetation Lawson Creek Photo: V Hong 2017
Rough Tree Fern trunk (rhs) Lawson Creek 2017 Image: V Hong

Gahnia sp. Sedge

Gahnia sp. with flower, Cataract Creek, 2020 Photo: E Carmichael
Gahnia sp. with flower, Cataract Creek, 2020 Photo: E Carmichael

Homalanthus populifolius Bleeding Heart or Native poplar, small tree

Homalanthus populifolius, Bleeding Heart or Native poplar, Waratah Street, 2016 Photo: R Grieve
Homalanthus populifolius seedling, Waratah Street, 2016 Photo: R Grieve

Leptospermum polygalifolium Tea-tree

Pittosporum undulatum, small tree

Todea Barbara King Fern

3. Blue Mountains Swamps.

The sedges, ferns and shrubs of the Lawson Creek swamps grow in peaty soils that contain large amounts of vegetable matter and are located in permanently damp situations. Swamps play a valuable ecological role, as they are a form of natural dam, storing a large amount of water and releasing it gradually, and so ensuring that streams and waterfalls keep flowing during drier periods.

Lovely swamp, North Lawson Park June 2009. Photo: P Ardill
Sedge swamp, North Lawson Park June 2009. Photo: P Ardill

Baumea rubiginosa (possibly; no inflorescence available) A slender, bright green sedge

Baumea rubiginosa? weeded Blackberry, Lawson swamp March 2018 Photo: P Ardillval, good condtion, weeded Blackberry, March 2018
Baumea rubiginosa? weeded Blackberry, Lawson swamp March 2018 Photo: P Ardill

Acacia ptychoclada Wattle, shrub

Blechnum wattsii, fern

A nice stand of Blechnum wattsii, Lawson swamp, March 2018
A nice stand of Blechnum wattsii, Lawson swamp, March 2018 Photo: P Ardill

Callistemon citrinus Crimson Bottlebush, tall shrub

Gleichenia dicarpa Coral Fern

Gleichenia fern Photo: V Hong 2017
Coral Fern Lawson 2017 Image: V Hong

Leptospermum polygalifolium small tree on swamp margins

Polyscias sambucifolia Elderberry Panax, tall shrub on swamp margins

4. Rainforest (Closed-forest).

The small patches of  shady, valley floor rainforest are dominated by the tall trees Coachwood (Ceratopetalum apetalum) and Sassafras (Doryphora sassafras). Cedar Wattle (Acacia elata), Rough Tree Fern (Cyathea australis), King Fern (Todea barbara), and a variety of Blechnum ferns are also present at south Lawson.

Rainforst glade Lawson Creek Photo: V Hong 2017
Rainforest glade Lawson Creek 2017 Image: V Hong

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(Note: the Commonwealth listed Vulnerable shrub species Persoonia acerosa (Needle Geebung) and the endemic species Acacia ptychoclada, a wattle, have been recorded on the bushcare site.)

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An excellent reference book for Blue Mountains flora is Native Plants of the Blue Mountains, by Margaret Baker and Robyn Corringham, Three Sisters Publications. It is available at local bookshops. The book is very reasonably priced, has great illustrations and lots of information about the local natural environment.

A great way to become familiar with the flora and weeds of the Lawson Creek catchment is to view our eight minute film, Bushcare Blue Mountains: South Lawson Park:  https://vimeo.com/verahong/south-lawson-bushcare . Many thanks to Vera and Craig at Seconds Minutes Hours Productions for their wonderful cinematography.

Fern fronds Lawson Creek Photo: V Hong
Emerging fern fronds, Lawson Creek, 2017 Image: V Hong
Lovely wattle Photo: V Hong
Acacia species, lovely wattle, 2017 Image: V Hong

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Animals/fauna

Approximately 100 indigenous fauna species have been recorded on the site. The list includes terrestrial species such as birds and marsupials and also stream (Lawson Creek) and groundwater (Lawson Creek Swamp) dwelling species.

The fauna list is comprised of casual observations and formal surveys.

  1. Casual observations of fauna have been made in the South Lawson Park area, either at bushcare sessions or by local residents, for many years. Confirmation tools and criteria applied have been the use of a field guide; consult WIRES; photograph; clear sighting of familiar species; online research; trained keying; confirmation by numerous residents; successive sightings; authority confirmation.
  2. Two formal fauna surveys (= FS 2018) were conducted on November 9 and November 11 2018, by J Bear and R Pattingale. (See: Archives / Fauna survey 2018)
  3. Macroinvertebrate (stream bugs) sampling results from both BMCC Aquatic Systems Officer testing and also volunteer StreamWatch testing extend back to ca.2005.
  4. Stygofauna (groundwater fauna) densities were recorded during the Stygofauna Monitoring Project 2011-2013 (See: Archives / Stygofauna Monitoring Project 2011).

Note: * = introduced species.

Ring-tailed Possum in the newly regenerated area April 2016
Common Ringtail Possum, Waratah Street, Lawson, April 2016 Photo: P. Ardill

Birds/avifauna

Australian King-Parrot Alisterus scapularis (FS 2018; 2 x Waratah St feeding on Privet seed March 2020)

Australian Magpie Cracticus tibicen (FS 2018)

Australian Raven juv. Corvus coronoides (reported, no date)

Australian Wood Duck Chenonetta jubata (Ferris Lane October 2019)

Brown Cuckoo-Dove Macropygia amboinensis (Lawson Creek feeding on Homalanthus populifolius fruit March 2020)

Brown Cuckoo-Dove feeding on Homalanthus populifolius fruit, Lawson Creek March 2020 Photo: P Ardill
Brown Cuckoo-Dove, Lawson Creek March 2020 Photo: P Ardill

Brown Thornbill Acanthiza pusilla (FS 2018)

Channel-billed Cuckoo Scythrops novaehollandiae (FS 2018)

Crested Pigeon Ocyphaps lophotes (18.09.18 Waratah Street east)

Crimson Rosella Platycercus elegans (frequent; 2017 & 2018, photo, Waratah St east; FS 2018)

Crimson rosellas (Photo: E Carmichael)
Crimson Rosellas Waratah St east, June 2018 Photo: E Carmichael

Eastern Blackbird Turdus merula* (FS 2018)

Eastern Koel Eudynamys orientalis (FS 2018)

Eastern Spinebill Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris (FS 2018)

Eastern Whipbird Psophodes olivaceus (frequent, heard 2018 Waratah St east; FS 2018)

Eastern Yellow Robin Eopsaltria australis (17.06.2018, Waratah St; FS 2018)

Eastern Yellow Robin November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018
Eastern Yellow Robin November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale

Galah Eolophus roseicapilla (17.09.17, detention basin)

Gang-gang Cockatoo Callocephalon fimbriatum (24/02/20, flock of 10-14, Cataract Falls, Cataract Creek, Lawson)

Gang-gang Cockatoos, flock of 10-14, Cataract Creek, Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill
Gang-gang Cockatoos, Cataract Creek, Feb 2020 Photo: P Ardill

Golden Whistler Pachycephala pectoralis (FS 2018)

Grey Butcherbird Cracticus torquatus (17.09.17, detention basin; FS 2018)

Grey Fantail Rhipidura albiscapa (17.06.18, M, Waratah St; FS 2018)

Grey Fantail "Rhipidura albiscapa" Regeneration area 2018
Grey Fantail Regeneration area June 2018 Photo: M Saltis

Laughing Kookaburra Dacelo novaeguineae (frequent 1995-2018; FS 2018)

Kookaburra, November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018
Kookaburra, November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale
Kookaburra, dacelo novaeguineae, November 2018 flora survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018
Kookaburra, dacelo novaeguineae, November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale


Leaden Flycatcher juv. Myiagra rubecula (reported, no date)

Lewin’s Honeyeater Meliphaga lewinii (FS 2018)

Little Wattlebird Anthochaera chrysoptera (FS 2018)

Magpie-lark, ‘Peewee’ Grallina cyanoleuca (FS 2018)

Female Peewee, the Magpie-lark, November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018
Female Peewee (vertical black eye-stripe), fauna survey 2018 Photo: R Pattingale

Masked Lapwing Vanellus miles (FS 2018)

Mistletoe Flowerpecker Dicaeum hirundinaceum (reported, no date; FS 2018)

New Holland Honeyeater Phylidonyris novaehollandiae (FS 2018)

Pied Currawong Strepera graculina (frequent; FS 2018)

Powerful Owl Ninox strenua (Night call recorded in Honour Ave Lawson, J Bear, mid-September 2019)

Rainbow Lorikeet Trichoglossus haematodus (FS 2018)

Red-tailed Black Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus banksii (authority sighting Adelina Falls April 2019)

Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus* (frequent 1995-2015; FS 2018)

Red Wattlebird Anthochaera carunculata (frequent, east Waratah St 1995-2018; FS 2018)

Satin Bowerbird Ptilonorhynchus violaceus (frequent, bower at east Waratah St 1990s; FS 2018)

Female or immature male Satin Bowerbird November 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018
Female (dark beak) Satin Bowerbird 2018 fauna survey Photo: R Pattingale 2018

Silvereye Zosterops lateralis (FS 2018)

Southern Boobook Ninox novaeseelandiae (not seen, heard 1990s Waratah St east)

Spotted Pardalote Pardalotus punctatus (FS 2018)

Striated Thornbill Acanthiza lineata (FS 2018)

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo Cacatua galerita (FS 2018)

Superb Fairy-wren Malurus cyaneus (FS 2018)

Superb Lyrebird Menura novaehollandiae (1981; approx 2000; 2015 Waratah St east)

Tawny Frogmouth Podargus strigoides (2000, pair, Livingstone/Honour ave carpark)

Welcome Swallow Hirundo neoxena (FS 2018)

White-faced Heron Egretta novaehollandiae (17.09.17, detention basin)

White-throated Treecreeper Cormobates leucophaea (FS 2018)

Yellow-tailed Black-Cockatoo Calyptorhynchus funereus (2 x Cataract Creek July 2018 photo; probable trace east Waratah Street 16.09.18; 4 birds x Lawson oval/Lawson Creek feeding on Hakea sp. 20/10/19)

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo Cataract Creek July 2018 (Photo P Ardill)
Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo Cataract Creek July 2018 Photo P Ardill

Yellow-faced Treecreeper Caligasvis chrysop (FS 2018)

Butterflies (Insects)

Carol Probets 20/02/17, Bellevue Park, GWH Lawson. 9 species

Candalides hyacinthina Varied Dusky-blue

Delias sp. Jezebel sp.

Dispar compacta Barred Skipper

Grass-dart species probably Ocybadistes walkeri Greenish Grass-dart

Hesperilla idothea Flame Sedge-skipper

Netrocoryne repanda; Bronze Flat

Tissiphone abeona Varied Sword-grass Brown

Toxida peron Dingy Grass-skipper

Vanessa itea Yellow Admiral

Beetles (Insects)

Chauliognathus lugubris Plague Soldier Beetles (August 2014 photo)

Plague Soldier Beetles on Leptopsermum sp. Tea tree, August 2014 (Photo BMCC)
Plague Soldier Beetles on Leptospermum sp. Tea tree, August 2014 Photo: K Hising/BMCC

Lawson Creek macroinvertebrates (Insects)

Order:

Hemiptera, Bugs (13.10.17 keyed, mid-Lawson Creek)

Emphemeroptera, Mayfly nymphs (13.10.17 keyed, mid-Lawson Creek)

Mayfly nymph. Lawson Creek, October, 2017
Mayfly nymph. Lawson Creek, October, 2017 Photo: P Ardill

Odonata

Suborder: Epiprocta, Dragonfly nymphs (13.10.17, keyed, mid-Lawson Creek)

Suborder: Zygoptera, Damselfly nymphs (13.10.17, keyed, mid-Lawson Creek)

Lawson Creek Swamp stygofauna / Fresh groundwater fauna

Stygofauna Monitoring Project 2010 -2011 (See: a. Archives / Stygofauna Monitoring Project Report 2011: Extract; b. Streamwatch)

Family:

Ostracods   (Crustaceans)                                  469 qty.

Syncarids     (Crustaceans)                                    53

Mites                                                                         36

Oligochaetes  (Worms)                                        373

Cyclopiod copepods    (Crustaceans)                134

Harpacticoid copepods   (Crustaceans)              14

Nematodes  (Roundworms)                                646

Crayfish (Crustacean)

Euastacus sp.; Crayfish (2016, mid-Lawson Creek, P, photo) Threatened by poor water quality and fox predation.

Euastacus species Lawson sub-catchment Dec 2018. Photo: A Parissi-Carmichael
Spiny Crayfish Lawson sub-catchment Dec 2018 Photo: A Carmichael-Parissi
Euastacus sp., Spiny Crayfish, a local species, Lawson Creek, 2016. Threatened by poor water quality and fox predation
Spiny Crayfish Lawson Creek, 2016. Photo: P Ardill

Frogs (Amphibians)

Crinia signifera Common Eastern Froglet (frequent, heard Lawson mid-swamp, 2009-2018; FS 2018). (North Lawson swamp, 2016, photo).

Crinia signifera, Common Eastern Froglet, North Lawson Park 2016 (Photo: P Ardill)
Common Eastern Froglet, North Lawson Park 2016 Photo: P Ardill

A green frog probably Litoria phyllochroa Leaf-green Tree Frog (seen 1988 Waratah St east)

Limnodynastes peronii Striped Marsh Frog (frequent; heard upper Lawson Creek 16/09/18; FS 2018)

Litoria verreauxii Verreaux’s Frog (FS 2018)

Uperoleia laevigata Smooth Toadlet (FS 2018)

Snails, slugs (Molluscs)

Arion ater* European Black Slug (centre Waratah St 2016)

Anton ater, European Black Slug.
European Black Slug Photo: P Ardill 2016

Limax maximus* Leopard Slug (FS 2018)

Spider 4 x sp. unknown (FS 2018)

Mammals: marsupials

Antechinus sp. Antechinus sp. (traces/specimens Waratah St, August 2018)

Perameles sp. Probably nasuta Long-nosed Bandicoot (1995 seen, firm; traces 2018, Waratah St east,  firm)

Petaurus breviceps Sugar Glider (trace Waratah Street east, July 2018; seen FS 2018)

Pseudocheirus peregrinus Common Ringtail Possum (April 2016 photo, Waratah St west; FS 2018)

Trichosurus vulpecula Common Brushtail Possum (July 2018 Waratah St east; FS 2018)

Wallabia bicolor Swamp Wallaby (scats detention basin 2017; resident sighting, former golf course 2017; scats Waratah St, August 2018, June 2019, March 2020)

Swamp Wallaby scays near detention basin 17.09.17
Swamp Wallaby scats detention basin, Lawson Creek 2017 Photo: P Ardill
Swamp wallaby scats, Waratah St restoration area March 2020 Photo: P Ardill
Swamp wallaby scats, Waratah St restoration area March 2020 Photo: P Ardill

Mammals: Megabats- Flying Foxes

Pteropus poliocephalus Grey-headed Flying Fox (observed Honour Ave 2015)

Mammals: Microbats – True Bats

Microbat sp. x 1 unknown (FS 2018)

Reptiles

Chelodina sp. likely longicollis Eastern Long-necked Turtle. (Lawson Creek approx 2000 photo)

Probably Chelodina longicollis, Eastern Long-necked Turtle, Lawson Creek c2000 (BMCC photo)
Probably Chelodina longicollis, Eastern Long-necked Turtle, Lawson Creek c.2000 Photo: BMCC

Lampropholis delicata Dark-flecked Garden Sunskink (FS 2018)

Lampropholis guichenoti Common Garden Skink (frequently Waratah St east)

Morelia spilota Diamond Python (2008 Waratah St east)

Notechis scutatis Tiger Snake (2008 Waratah St east)

Pseudechis porphyriacus Red-bellied Black Snake (June 2013 detention basin; frequent 1984-present, Waratah St east)

Pseudonaja textilis Eastern Brown Snake (1984-2012, Waratah St east)

Tiliqua scincoides Blue Tongue Lizard (approx 2000 photo, Waratah St east)

Tiliqua scincoides, Eastern Blue-Tongued Skink Waratah Street c2000
Blue Tongue Lizard, Waratah Street, Lawson c.2000 Photo: BMCC

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Weeds

The purpose of bushcare is to contribute to the  healthy functioning and preservation of the naturally evolved bushlands and ecosystems of a region. For the purposes of bushcare, a weed is considered to be a plant that is growing in or is likely to spread into but is not a naturally evolved species of the local and regional bushland and ecosystems. A weed can be an overseas species, or an Australian native species that has commenced growing in an ecosystem to which it does not naturally belong.

Some, but not all, introduced plants, in the absence of the natural control factors of their original ecosystem, grow and spread so vigorously that they overwhelm and replace many of the locally and regionally evolved plants that constitute the local ecosystem, significantly altering and even destroying the functioning of that ecosystem. This type of weed may be declared a “Priority Weed” or a “Weed of Regional Concern” under the NSW Biosecurity Act 2015. Public authorities and private landowners are required to manage this declared  weed in a specified way.

These are the most prevalent and threatening weeds located on the site.

  • Arum lily, usually found in swamps
  • Blackberry, swamps and modified bushland
Treated Blackberry in Gleichenia swamp, Lawson Creek
Treated Blackberry in Gleichenia sp. Lawson swamp 2017 (Photo: P Ardill)
Rampant Blackberry upper Lawson swamp Dec 2018 Photo: P Ardill
Rampant Blackberry upper Lawson swamp Dec 2018 Photo: P Ardill

  • Broom, shrub or small tree found in forest or modified bushland
  • Creeping Buttercup, a spreading herb found in damp situations

Unmanaged stormwater on track, flowing through weeds and carrying seed into Lawson Creek, Waratah Street, June 2007
Creeping Buttercup with Privet in background, Waratah Street, June 2007 Photo: P Ardill
  • English Ivy, a smothering climber, modifed bushland
  • Gorse, a highly invasive shrub (two plants 2017), modified bushland
  • Grasses such as Panic Veldt Grass (Ehrharta erecta), Yorkshire Fog, Sweet Vernal-grass and Pigeon Grass are present.
  • Japanese Honeysuckle, a vigorous climber, modified bushland
  • Juncus microcephalus, a perennial sedge found in damp situations
  • Montbretia, a herb that colonises stream banks and damp areas
Weeds in Lawson swamp: Deadly nightshade, MOntbretia, Arum lily, March 2018
Weeds in Lawson swamp: Arum lily, Deadly nightshade, Montbretia, March 2018 Photo: P Ardill
  • Privet (both small and large leaved varieties), modified bushland & forest
  • Pussy Willow, damp areas.
  • Smaller quantities of Cootamundra Wattle, Himalayan Honeysuckle, Butterfly Bush (Buddleia davidii), and Turkey Rhubarb are present and under varying degrees of control.

See https://weedsbluemountains.org.au for detailed photographs of Blue Mountains weeds and how to treat them.

Best of all, visit one of the two local provenance native nurseries in the Blue Mountains and buy their plants. They are Wild Plant Rescue, Katoomba, and the Conservation Society Plant Nursery.

(Australian Copyright Act 1968 applies. Text and photos on this site are subject to copyright. Many thanks to the members of South Lawson Park Bushcare Group, our BMCC Bushcare Officer and Second Minutes Hours Productions for their contributions to this website)